Israel Environment Bulletin Summer 1993-5754, Vol. 16, No. 3

ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION

Collection and Disposal of Waste for Recycling Law

It was a long struggle, but Israel’s first recycling legislation nearly four years in the makingwas finally approved by the Knesset in June 1993. Passage of the law coincided with a government decision to accord solid waste management higher priority. The decisionto rid Israel of hundreds of unmonitored garbage dumps and to replace them with several highly regulated sanitary landfillsis expected to help boost recycling as well. The Ministry of the Environment will be hard at work in the coming months, setting priorities for recycling initiatives, drafting regulations, and ensuring that passage of the law will make a real difference in solid waste management.

The newly-approved recycling law provides the principles and framework required to make recycling possible. It authorizes local authorities, and obliges them when required by the Minister of the Environment, to allocate sites for recycling centers and to install recycling facilities and containers, by themselves or in conjunction with others. The law also entitles local authorities to pass by-laws outlining procedures for waste collection and disposal for recycling purposes. The law empowers the Minister of the Environment, in consultation with the Minister of the Interior, to promulgate regulations or issue orders with respect to the types and quantities of waste which a local authority must set aside for recycling.

Business or home owners within a municipality operating recycling centers, must install and maintain recycling containers in accordance with the instructions of the local authority. Waste must be separated at source and discarded in designated containers for the various components of waste; non-recyclable waste may not be discarded into recycling facilities.

Other sections of the law relate to ownership rights over the waste in recycling facilities, manner of removal and transport of the waste for recycling, appointment of inspectors for enforcement, establishment of fines, including payment of damages to cover expenses, and establishment of liability by a manager, partner or responsible official in case the violation was committed by a legal entity.

A key provision in the law is the authority of the Minister of the Environment (with the approval of the Knesset Interior and Environmental Committee, and when local authorities are involved, in consultation with the Minister of the Interior) to promulgate regulations, on any matter relating to enforcement of the law, including such matters as: types of waste for recycling; categories of businesses required to recycle; shape, size, color, marking, location, and installation of containers and recycling facilities; marking and labeling products or materials to indicate that they are made of recycled or recyclable materials.

The law, which will enter into force in December 1993, will hopefully usher in a new era of environmentally-sound and economically-feasible solid waste treatment.

Abatement of Nuisances Regulations (Used Oil)

Used motor oil is a hazardous substance, whose unregulated use and discharge threatens water and air quality, requires environmentally-sound disposal.

In order to prevent air pollution and water contamination and to preserve environmental quality, the Minister of the Environment has recently signed regulations, under the Abatement of Nuisances Law, the Licensing of Businesses Law and the Water Law, prohibiting the burning and improper disposal of used oil. Sellers, users and consumers of oil (for lubrication, insulation and similar uses) may only dispose of used oil in the manner specified in the regulations, namely through its collection in specially-designated receptacles and their subsequent transport and disposal to the hazardous waste site in Ramat Hovav or to a recycling facility. The regulations, scheduled to enter into effect in December 1993, provide for a criminal punishment of imprisonment and/or fine in cases of violation.

Licensing of Businesses Regulations (Pest Extermination)
(Amendment)

The Minister of the Environment has recently signed regulations, under the Licensing of Businesses Law and the Hazardous Substances Law, meant to increase supervision over exterminators and further control the use of insecticides. The new regulations oblige exterminators to maintain record books with full details on each extermination, including place, date, type of pest and kind of insecticide. In addition, the amendment provides a revised listing of preparations approved for use, specifying the insects and rodents for which each material is designated and indicating usage restrictions. The listing includes several categories of insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis, Insect growth regulators oils, Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids, Organophosphates, Chlorinated hydrocarbons and Carbamates) and rodent-killers (Anticoagulants). Two potentially poisonous substances, for which no antidote exists, were removed from the previous listing of permitted substances.

Promulgation of the amended regulations, which entered into effect in June, is expected to further tighten control and supervision over insecticide use in Israel.

ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION

Collection and Disposal of Waste for Recycling Law

It was a long struggle, but Israel’s first recycling legislation nearly four years in the makingwas finally approved by the Knesset in June 1993. Passage of the law coincided with a government decision to accord solid waste management higher priority. The decisionto rid Israel of hundreds of unmonitored garbage dumps and to replace them with several highly regulated sanitary landfillsis expected to help boost recycling as well. The Ministry of the Environment will be hard at work in the coming months, setting priorities for recycling initiatives, drafting regulations, and ensuring that passage of the law will make a real difference in solid waste management.

The newly-approved recycling law provides the principles and framework required to make recycling possible. It authorizes local authorities, and obliges them when required by the Minister of the Environment, to allocate sites for recycling centers and to install recycling facilities and containers, by themselves or in conjunction with others. The law also entitles local authorities to pass by-laws outlining procedures for waste collection and disposal for recycling purposes. The law empowers the Minister of the Environment, in consultation with the Minister of the Interior, to promulgate regulations or issue orders with respect to the types and quantities of waste which a local authority must set aside for recycling.

Business or home owners within a municipality operating recycling centers, must install and maintain recycling containers in accordance with the instructions of the local authority. Waste must be separated at source and discarded in designated containers for the various components of waste; non-recyclable waste may not be discarded into recycling facilities.

Other sections of the law relate to ownership rights over the waste in recycling facilities, manner of removal and transport of the waste for recycling, appointment of inspectors for enforcement, establishment of fines, including payment of damages to cover expenses, and establishment of liability by a manager, partner or responsible official in case the violation was committed by a legal entity.

A key provision in the law is the authority of the Minister of the Environment (with the approval of the Knesset Interior and Environmental Committee, and when local authorities are involved, in consultation with the Minister of the Interior) to promulgate regulations, on any matter relating to enforcement of the law, including such matters as: types of waste for recycling; categories of businesses required to recycle; shape, size, color, marking, location, and installation of containers and recycling facilities; marking and labeling products or materials to indicate that they are made of recycled or recyclable materials.

The law, which will enter into force in December 1993, will hopefully usher in a new era of environmentally-sound and economically-feasible solid waste treatment.

Abatement of Nuisances Regulations (Used Oil)

Used motor oil is a hazardous substance, whose unregulated use and discharge threatens water and air quality, requires environmentally-sound disposal.

In order to prevent air pollution and water contamination and to preserve environmental quality, the Minister of the Environment has recently signed regulations, under the Abatement of Nuisances Law, the Licensing of Businesses Law and the Water Law, prohibiting the burning and improper disposal of used oil. Sellers, users and consumers of oil (for lubrication, insulation and similar uses) may only dispose of used oil in the manner specified in the regulations, namely through its collection in specially-designated receptacles and their subsequent transport and disposal to the hazardous waste site in Ramat Hovav or to a recycling facility. The regulations, scheduled to enter into effect in December 1993, provide for a criminal punishment of imprisonment and/or fine in cases of violation.

Licensing of Businesses Regulations (Pest Extermination)
(Amendment)

The Minister of the Environment has recently signed regulations, under the Licensing of Businesses Law and the Hazardous Substances Law, meant to increase supervision over exterminators and further control the use of insecticides. The new regulations oblige exterminators to maintain record books with full details on each extermination, including place, date, type of pest and kind of insecticide. In addition, the amendment provides a revised listing of preparations approved for use, specifying the insects and rodents for which each material is designated and indicating usage restrictions. The listing includes several categories of insecticides (Bacillus thuringiensis, Insect growth regulators oils, Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids, Organophosphates, Chlorinated hydrocarbons and Carbamates) and rodent-killers (Anticoagulants). Two potentially poisonous substances, for which no antidote exists, were removed from the previous listing of permitted substances.

Promulgation of the amended regulations, which entered into effect in June, is expected to further tighten control and supervision over insecticide use in Israel.