The preparations for the arrival of the “Adir” (F-35I) are coming to an end in “Golden Eagle” Squadron’s maintenance department. The first course that trained “Adir” technicians of all levels has come to an end

Zohar Boneh

“We understood that something was different from the beginning”, said Corporal Meir Yisahkov and Private Shoval Shemesh, the outstanding cadets of the course. “In technical school, people were excited to hear that we were going to work on the ‘Adir’. We didn’t understand what that meant then, but we knew that it was something big”.

Today, after nine weeks in which about 50 soldiers were trained to maintain the “Adir”, the “Golden Eagle” Squadron’s technical course came to an end.

Adir Technicians Ready

Photography: Adi Abu

Looking to the Future
Throughout the course, the cadets underwent various instructions and received extensive knowledge in all fields relevant to their work, including mechanics and electronics. Furthermore, they were closely acquainted with the attributes of the jet and learned how to check it and operate its ground equipment. “This course is different from every ‘Adir’ course that will be held in the IAF in the future”, said Maj. Roei Maimon, the technical Officer of the “Golden Eagle” Squadron.  “In the current course we built and designed the training on our own. The instructions were frontal and we gave the technicians the tools in the best way we could”.

In the future, according to Maj. Maimon, part of the maintenance training will be performed in the advanced simulator, the only one of its kind in the IAF. The simulator, which will be a significant tool in the training process, will also keep the jets available and simulate different processes, most of which will be performed daily and will allow the technical personnel to accumulate physical experience.

Adir Technicians Ready

Photography: Adi Abu

Overcoming Obstacles
The course’s instructors were senior technical personnel from the IAF Technical Academy, the Squadron and foreign instructors who traveled to Israel in order to support the integration process. “Many of the lessons were held in English, as much of the program and concepts are in English”, shared Capt. Eddy Grishkavitzos.

The foreign language alongside the advanced technology and uncertainty regarding the new jet, created a challenging course. “It isn’t simple to study in your second language”, said Private Yisahkov. “Many of us study English in the afternoon and we overcame the challenge easily”.

Adir Technicians Ready

Photography: Adi Abu

The Beginning of the End
This might be the end of the course, but a few months from now, the technicians will soon be fully qualified. “We set as a goal for ourselves that by the end of January, a month and a half after the jets land in Israel, we will start seeing enlisted soldiers signing them off for sorties”, shared Maj. Maimon.

The career personnel, who studied about the jet in the U.S, will be the first ones to become qualified to work on it. The rest of the maintenance personnel will be qualified thereafter and will immediately begin their work routine which will include differently configured test flights.

Source