ENVIRONMENT UPDATE (GPO)

Jerusalem, 10 February 1994

* ISRAEL, JORDAN, EGYPT OKAY EILAT POLLUTION CONTROL PLAN.

Israel, Jordan and Egypt have agreed on a joint program to control pollution in the Gulf of Eilat in an effort to protect fragile coral reefs. The plan was worked out in regional Middle East negotiations on the environment in Egypt and finalized this week. ‘Oil spills are a major threat to the fragile ecosystem in the gulf. Oil tankers are moving there and we need to protect the coral reefs,’ said Environment Ministry Director-General Yisrael Peleg. The plan calls for establishment of stations with equipment and experts on marine pollution at Eilat, Aqaba and Nuweiba. It will be financed by the European Union and the World Bank. (‘Jerusalem Post’, 20.1.94)

* GREEN FORUM ESTABLISHED FOR JUDEA, SAMARIA.

The Samaria Towns Association for Environmental Protection, the Nature Reserves Authority and the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel have established a ‘Green Forum’ in Judea and Samaria to deal with the expected changes in the area. ‘The group was established to prevent erosion in all that has been achieved so far in environmental protection and to promote a number of important projects,’ said NRA spokeswoman Dina Weinstein. (‘Jerusalem Post’, 25.1.94)

* PAZ DEVELOPS NON-TOXIC ANTI-FREEZE.

The Paz company has begun to market a new preparation which it has developed: a ‘green’ anti-freeze for vehicles which is non-toxic to humans and the environment. The product, Paz Green Kol 6, was developed at Paz laboratories in Haifa and is based on a non-toxic synthetic material. It is meant to replace the very toxic material upon which regular anti-freezes which are still being marketed are based. The managing director of Paz Oils and Chemicals, Reuven Marom, said that the decision to develop the new product was made in light of the growing awareness in the world about the environment. ‘Globes’, 25.1.94)

* FIRST ‘GREEN’ GAS STATION IN ISRAEL OPENS.

The ‘Sonol Yonah Avarech’ gas station in Kfar Sava is the first ‘green’ gas station in Israel and was built according to advanced models which exist in the United States and Europe. Traditional gas stations are a source of environmental pollution, such as: emissions of fuel droplets into the air, contamination of the ground and ground water, as a result of fuel storage, as well as noise pollution. In order to reduce the amount of fuel leakage into the air and ground, the ‘Sonol Yonah Avarech’ station uses a closed system to feed back fuel droplets into storage, ‘secondary tanks’ with a charcoal filter system to store fuel, and an automatic pump mechanism which drains liquids which spill on the ground into an oil separator. The separator traps oils and fuel, and discharges the water. The station’s office is also acoustically engineered to block much of the sound generated at the station. (‘The Biosphere’, volume 23, pp.2-3).