Home Front Command exercise trains future commanders to save lives

Drill prepares future reserve commanders to handle emergency scenarios, focusing largely on search-and-rescue maneuvers

Date: 12/05/2012, 5:14 PM     Author: Yair Barzilai and IDF (Zahal) Website

The Home Front Command is currently holding an exercise training future commanders to save lives in emergency scenarios, focusing largely on search-and-rescue maneuvers.

Home Front Command exercise trains future commanders to save lives

The drill, which concludes today (Wednesday, December 5) has taken place over several, non-consecutive weeks. It is intended to prepare reservists who are in training to become battalion and company commanders.

Home Front Command exercise trains future commanders to save lives

Both the Search and Rescue Unit and the Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Defense Unit of the Home Front Command have taken part in the exercise. “We have highly motivated reserve soldiers who are dedicated to saving lives, training to become company and battalion commanders,” said Col. Ramtin Sevti, Commander of the Search and Rescue Unit, who commanded the exercise. “We are determined to learn [and] improve our techniques in order to provide the best possible support for the Israeli home front.”

Home Front Command exercise trains future commanders to save lives

The Search and Rescue Unit includes doctors, rescuers, and engineers – experts in the field of recovery – and is tasked with assisting during emergencies, both in Israel and abroad. “My team will continue to provide care to those in need anywhere around the world, as we have done in the past,” said Col. Sevti. “Helping people is what we live for.”

Home Front Command exercise trains future commanders to save lives

Last month, Col. Sevti commanded an IDF (Zahal) delegation dispatched to Ghana to assist in efforts to rescue civilians trapped by the collapse of a large shopping center. In the past, the Search and Rescue Unit has participated in life-saving efforts following natural disasters in Mexico (1985), Armenia (1988), Greece (1999), Turkey (1999), Haiti (2010), and Japan (2011).