Manpower in the health professions 2011
​The publication “Manpower in the health professions 2011” presents up-to-date information on the health professions in Israel in 2011, compared with the OECD states. The publication contains information on the supply of qualified health professionals and information on the practitioners:

  • The supply of qualified health professionals: is based on the licensing records in the Ministry of Health’s databases and on correlation with the civil registry.
  • Practitioners of the health professions: based on a manpower survey conducted by the Central Bureau of Statistics, according to the definitions of the survey.
Supply of qualified health professionals
The information on the supply of qualified health professionals: is based on the registration of the licensing certificates in the Ministry of Health’s databases and on correlation with the civil registry. 
The downward trend in the proportion of doctors, nurses, dentists and dental technicians has continued in 2011 compared with the upward trend in the rest of the health professions.
Doctors
The proportion of doctors in Israel has been gradually deteriorating in the past decade, although it is still high relative to the average among OECD countries. The number of medical school graduates in Israel is low (4.1 per 100,000 inhabitants) compared with the OECD average (10.4). The number of doctors up to age 65 has decreased to 3.33 per 1,000 inhabitants by the end of 2011, compared with 3.71 at the end of 2000 – a 10% decrease. The decline in the number of doctors is a result of the decline in the number of new licenses, which began in the late 1990s with the tapering off of the wave of immigration, and as a result of the increase in the retirement rates of doctors aged 65 and above – 24% in 2011 compared with 18% in 2000 and, among the immigrant doctors, the percentage has increased to 25% from 11% respectively). The number of new licenses issued in 2011 increased to 900, compared with 726 last year and 600 in the five years preceding that. From 2005, about half of the licenses have been issued to Israel graduates, compared with one third in 2000. There has been an increase in the number of licenses issued in the past two years, resulting from an increase in the number of licenses to Israel graduates, about 350 per year, compared with about 300 at the end of the 1970s, as well as an increase in the number of Israelis studying abroad, 302 in 2011, 178 last year and 101 in 2005. The primary study countries for foreign country Israeli graduates in 2011 was” 83 in Hungary, 66 in Jordan, Egypt or Syria, 50 in Romania and 43 in Italy. The proportion of women among the doctors is on the increase, with 42% of the doctors aged up to 65 and 47% of the doctors up to age 45 – compared with 39% and 43% in 2000, respectively. The percentage will continue to increase, since about half of the licenses are issued to women. The percentage of doctors under age 45 is on the decrease, standing at 27% in 2011 compared with 38% in 2000. This trend will continue if the number of new licenses will not increase substantially. The percentage of doctors aged 55 and above is higher in Israel compared with the average among OECD countries (Israel – 49% and 30% average in the OECD).
Half of the doctors under age 45 are Israeli graduates, compared with 40% of the doctors under age 65. About a third of the doctors, and 38% of the doctors under age 65, immigrated to Israel from 1989 and studied medicine abroad. The percentage is stable in recent years.
Specialist doctors
The number of specialists is on the rise, with 1.76 specialists up to age 65 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 1.53 at the end of 2000 – a 15% increase. The percentage of specialists up to age 45 is in decline, 22% compared with 30% in 2000, and the percentage of specialists aged 55 and above is on the increase – 48% and 34% respectively. The percentage of specialists out of the total number of doctors up to age 65 is increasing, 53% in 2011 compared with 41% in 2000, and the percentage aged 45-64is higher – 59%. The proportion of women is on the increase, with 38% of the specialists aged up to 65 and 51% of the specialists up to age 45 – compared with 30% and 39% in 2000, respectively. Half of the specialists up to age 65 are Israel graduates, and one third came to Israel in the last two decades. A fifth of the specialists own two specializations or more and 1% have 3 or more specializations.
Medical specializations
At the end of 2011, 58% of the specialist doctors specialized in internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, obstetrics and gynecology and psychiatry.
The percentage of women is relatively high among adolescent psychiatrists, pathologic anatomy, family medicine, endocrinology, diagnostic radiology, geriatrics, oncology, hematology, pediatrics, psychiatry, neurology and dermatology and venereology. In 2011
800 specialist licenses were issued, of which 15% were for internal medicine, 10% for pediatrics, 7.5% family medicine, 5% obstetrics and gynecology, 5% in orthopedic surgery, 4% in psychiatry and 4% in anesthesiology.
The number of specialists up to age 65 has increased in the past decade in most of the medical professions. From 2000, the percentage has doubled in emergency medicine, grown by three quarters in geriatrics, two thirds in oncology, half in family medicine, medical genetics and infectious diseases, one third in pediatric hemato-oncology, internal medicine, pediatric intensive care, pediatric neurology, pediatric nephrology and physical medicine and rehabilitation, and by one quarter in general intensive care and carpal surgery.
Nurses
The proportion of nurses in Israel is in decline, and is low compared with the OECD average. The number of nursing school graduates in Israel is low (12.2 per 100,000 inhabitants) compared with the OECD average (34.4). The number of nurses up to age 65 has decreased to 5.95 at the end of 2011, compared with 6.47 at the end of 2000 – an 8% decrease.
Over the past decade there has been a decline in the number of new recognitions in nursing – 941 in 2011 compared with 1,863 in 2002 – a 50% decline. The number of recognitions of practical nurses has declined and the number of newly qualified nurses is relatively stable, about 1000 over the past decade. In 2011, 1,232 new qualified nurses were recognized, of which 291 were reskilled from practical nursing. Most of the nurses up to age 65 (81%) are qualified, compared with 63% in 2000. The percentage of nurses under age 45 is on the decrease, standing at 41% in 2011 compared with 53% in 2000. The percentage of qualified nurses who have graduated from higher training is on the increase, 42% in 2011 compared with 38% in 2000. Most (89%) of the recognized nursing professionals are women.
Dentists: 
The proportion of dentists in Israel has been gradually deteriorating over the past decade, although it is still high relative to the OECD average. The percentage of doctors up to age 65 has decreased to 1.05 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 1.12 at the end of 2000 – a 6% decrease. 227 new dentist licenses were issued in 2011, 35% of those to women – a steady percentage over the past decade. 25% were issued to Israel graduates, 44% to Eastern Europe graduates, 17% to Jordan, Syria and Egypt graduates, and 12% to America and Western Europe graduates. The percentage of dentists under age 45 is on the decrease, standing at 35% at the end of 2011 compared with 52% in 2000. The percentage of women out of the total number of dentists was 37% in 2011, the percentage of dentists up to age 45 is increasing, 42% in 2011 compared with 36% in 2000. About a quarter of the dentists are Israel graduates and about half are Eastern Europe graduates. A quarter of the dentists immigrated to Israel in the last two decades.
Specialist dentists
The percentage of specialist dentists up to age 65 was 0.09 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.08 at the end of 2000 – a 9% increase. The percentage of specialists out of the total of dentists is relatively low, 9% compared with 7% in 2000. A quarter were up to age 45, half were aged 45-64 and a quarter were aged 65 and above. The proportion of specialists up to age 65 for prosthodontic rehabilitation was 0.02 per 1,000 inhabitants, in the rest of the professions the proportion was even lower.
Dental technicians
The number of doctors up to age 65 has decreased to 0.47 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.52 at the end of 2000 – a 10% decrease. A quarter (23%) of the dental technicians are women.
Assistant pharmacists
The number of doctors up to age 65 has decreased to 0.11 per 1,000 inhabitants by the end of 2011, compared with 0.16 at the end of 2000 – a 31% decrease. Most (87%) of the assistant pharmacists are women.
The proportion of pharmacists, psychologists, dental hygienists, medical laboratory workers, optometrists, clinical geneticists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists and dieticians has continued to increase in 2011:
Pharmacologists
The proportion of pharmacologists in Israel is on the increase, a high proportion relative to the OECD average. The proportion of pharmacologists up to age 65 has increased to 0.82 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.61 at the end of 2000 – a 34% increase. In 2011 380 new pharmacologist licenses were issued, 42% of those to Israel graduates and 45% to Jordan graduates, compared to 53% and 29% respectively last year. Since the mid-1990s, more than half of the licenses were issued to women. Half of the pharmacologists are under age 45, standing at 56% in 2011 compared with 49% in 2000. Over half (57%) of the pharmacologists are women – a stable proportion over the past decade. In 2011, half (52%) of the pharmacologists up to age 65 were Israel graduates, 18% were Eastern Europe graduates and 12% were Jordan graduates.
Psychologists
The proportion of psychologists up to age 65 is on the increase – 1.13 at the end of 2011, compared with 0.89 at the end of 2000 – a 27% increase. About three quarters of all psychiatrists are women, a stable percentage over the past decade. Three quarters are Israel graduates. About half of the psychologists are below age 45, 47% in 2011, a stable percentage over the past decade. In 2011 516 new permit holders were added to the psychiatry profession, a high number compared with 300-350 on average per year since the mid-1990s. Most of the new permit holders are Israel trained, compared with two thirds in the early 1990s.
Specialist Psychologists
The proportion of specialists up to age 65 is on the increase – 0.58 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.54 at the end of 2000 – a 15% increase. Over half (54%) of the psychologists and three quarters (73%) of the psychologists aged 45 and above were specialists – a stable proportion over the past decade. Most of the specializations are in clinical psychology (56%) and educational psychology (28%), 0.43 and 0.22 per 1,000 inhabitants, respectively. The percentage of trainers among the specialist psychologists has been stable since the late 1990s – 43% at the end of 2011.
Dental hygienists
The proportion of dental hygienists up to age 65 is on the increase – 0.24 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.12 at the end of 2000 – a two-fold increase. Most (99%) of the dental hygienists are women.
Optometrists
The proportion of optometrists up to age 65 was 0.19 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.11 at the end of 2000 – a 68% increase. 85% of the optometrists are women.
Medical laboratory workers
The proportion of medical laboratory workers up to age 65 has increased to 1.08 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.99 at the end of 2000 – a 9% increase. Most (84%) of the medical laboratory workers are women.
Clinical geneticists
The proportion of clinical geneticists up to age 65 was 0.012 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.010 at the end of 2000 – a 17% increase, most of these are women (93%).
Physiotherapists
The proportion of physiotherapists up to age 65 is on the increase, 0.50 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.38 at the end of 2000 – a 34% increase, most of these are women (72%).
Occupational therapists
The proportion of occupational therapists up to age 65 is on the increase, 0.42 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.31 at the end of 2000 – a 37% increase, most of these are women (97%).
Speech therapists
The proportion of speech therapists up to age 65 is on the increase, 0.35 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.21 at the end of 2000 – a 64% increase, most of these are women (91%).
Dietitians
The proportion of dietitians up to age 65 is on the increase, 0.19 per 1,000 inhabitants at the end of 2011, compared with 0.18 at the end of 2000 – a 5% increase, most of these are women (96%).
Non-regulated auxiliary medical professions
According to the directions of the supreme court from April 29, 2004, the Ministry of Health discontinued the issuance of Status Recognition Certificates to the following professionals, whose professions are not statutorily codified: creative and expression therapists, medical technologists, X-ray technicians, dental assistants, and clinical criminologists.