World Immunization Week is Currently being Marked ​

Following are data regarding this topic:
95.5% of parents in Israel immunize their children with the routine vaccines up to the age of two years (93.5 among Jews and 98.5 in the Arab sector). In the years 2009-11, the Ministry of Health added two vaccines to the routine vaccines given to children in Israel: Prevenar vaccine against pneumococcus infections, and the vaccine against rotavirus. 
Thanks to these vaccines, dangerous diseases are prevented:
Following the addition of the Prevenar vaccine in June, 2009:

  • There was a 70% reduction in the rate of invasive infections caused by pneumococcus bacteria.
  • There was a reduction in the visit rate of children to emergency rooms due to pneumonia.
  • There was a reduction in the rate of children suffering from severe ear inflammation.
  • There was a reduction in the rate of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pneumococcus bacteria.
  • There was a reduction in the rate of pneumococcus infections in the adult population, as a result of reduced contagion from infants and young children.
The vaccine against rotavirus was added in 2010. Since then, the characteristic digestive illnesses in the winter that had been seen in the past were reduced among infants and toddlers. In the winter, the peak period for digestive illnesses, there was a 60% reduction in the visit rate for 0-2 year old children to clinics due to digestive illness (diarrhea), and a 48% reduction in the visit rate for 2-4 year old children.
This year, the vaccine against the HPV virus was included in the basket of health services. The papilloma virus is transmitted in sexual relations and may cause cervical cancer several years after the infection.

The vaccine will be given nationwide in schools, to girls in the eighth grade. This is expected to reduce the morbidity from cervical cancer.