In cooperation with the Israel Embassy in Singapore, David Barashi, one of the founding members of the Dream Doctors, came to Singapore to conduct a three-day workshop for medical staff from the Children’s Cancer Foundation and the National University Hospital Singapore.

 Medical clowning in Singapore

 

Copyright: Embassy of Israel, Singapore

Over the last few years, Israeli clowns have been popping into hospital operating rooms and intensive care units with balloons and kazoos in hand, teaming up with doctors to develop laughter therapies they say help with disorders like pain. Medical clowning, which combines theatre performance with drama therapy and elements of nursing, has grown in popularity in recent years to become a worldwide phenomenon. The Dream Doctors medical clowns project was established in Israel in 2002.

Israel is considered a leader in professionalizing the field of medical clowning and providing scientific evidence for its effectiveness. One study conducted around the world showed that children treated with medical clowning recovered up to 30% faster. Other studies have demonstrated that medical clowning programs can significantly reduce the pain and fears suffered by patients in hospitals.
 
In cooperation with the Israel Embassy in Singapore, David Barashi, one of the founding members of the Dream Doctors, came to Singapore in November 2013 to conduct a three-day workshop for medical staff from the Children’s Cancer Foundation and the National University Hospital Singapore. This was the first time that medical and paramedical staffs in Singapore were exposed to the phenomenon of medical clowning.

While he was in town, David aka Dush the Clown was featured on various media platforms including 938LIVE’s Body & Soul, CNA’S AM LIVE, SG Connect and Singapore Tonight.

 Medical clowning in Singapore
 Medical clowning in Singapore

 Copyright: Embassy of Israel, Singapore

Israel has a vision of creating a global model for Clowning Therapy and has kickstarted this goal with a BA program in Clowning Therapy at Haifa University that is currently expanding into an MA program as well. Two years ago, Israel’s Dream Doctors medical clowns project hosted an international congress of medical clowning associations to share the theories and practices of this unusual approach. At least 200 medical clowns from North America, Australia, Portugal, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland and France attended this groundbreaking congress.
 
The project is also reaching out to third-world countries. In January 2010, they contributed to the humanitarian mission to hospitals and orphanages in Haiti following the earthquake and since then, they have traveled to various parts of Africa, South America, India and Nepal.