How Will A Giant Airbase Deal With A Missile Attack?

Photo courtesy of Photography Department at Nevatim Airbase

How Will A Giant Airbase Deal With A Missile Attack?

Photo courtesy of Photography Department at Nevatim Airbase

How Will A Giant Airbase Deal With A Missile Attack?

Photo courtesy of Photography Department at Nevatim Airbase

How Will A Giant Airbase Deal With A Missile Attack?

Photo courtesy of Photography Department at Nevatim Airbase

Inhabitants of the Nevatim airbase had to deal with a training exercise involving dozens of “code red” alarms and missiles falling throughout the airbase. While they protected themselves, the aircrews and ground crews worked to continue airbase activities in spite of the emergency situation that made these activities all the more difficult

Shani Pomes

In the blink of an eye, a routine day at the Nevatim airbase became a warzone: a “code red” alarm was heard throughout the airbase and a missile subsequently fell next to a building of one of the squadrons. Immediately thereafter, another missile caused a fire that was quickly doused and dozens of wounded soldiers and soldiers suffering from anxiety needed to be evacuated for medical treatment.

Soldiers from Nevatim airbase had to deal with this situation, among more than 80 other such scenarios, as part of a large functional-continuity exercise. During the exercise, the soldiers had to deal with different emergency situations from “code red” alarms that blared dozens of times to the threat of attacks on planes at the airbase.

“The goal of the exercise is to thoroughly prepare the various units of the airbase. We wanted to train everyone for difficult combat situations and to improve the synchronization of the whole airbase”, explains Major Dror, Deputy Commander of the Aviation Squadron at Nevatim airbase. “This is an exercise that is designed to hone commanding skills under conditions of uncertainty and we put a heavy emphasis on the element of surprise”.

The Closest To Reality

The uncertainty and the surprise started from the very beginning of the training exercise: while the soldiers serving at Nevatim airbase gathered at the center of the airbase to hear a briefing prior to expected exercise, a siren was heard, informing them that the exercise had already begun.

“This wasn’t the only surprise: we decided to grab key people from each unit, so that their soldiers would have to deal with the fact that not everyone was presented to complete the mission”, says First Lieutenant Kobi Vakeen, the Functional Continuity Officer on base. “We wanted the soldiers and the officers to deal with the biggest commanding dilemmas there are. What’s crucial about this exercise is that nothing is expected, everything happens as close to the reality as possible”. The results of the training exercise are a measurement of the readiness of the airbase at the moment of truth, which demands that its soldiers be prepared to operate in times of emergency.
“You can look at this as an exercise, but you can also look at it as checking ourselves in order to know where we need to improve so that we will be as ready as possible at the moment of truth”, concludes First Lieutenant Vakeen.

 

Source