Pregnant UAV Operator

Ronnie is at the end of her eight month of her first pregnancy, but nonetheless she continues as a reservist at the UAV squadron, where she executes missions for hours on end Advanced pregnancy has not stopped Captain Ronnie, a UAV operator, from coming to the UAV squadron and executing missions. As if her challenging missions were not enough, her husband is also busy during the operation serving as a control officer in the IAF situation room

Nadav Berger

“In some sense, we are protecting the country today so that our children will have a country tomorrow”, says Captain Ronnie, UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) operator who operates the “Hermes 450”. These days, she is at the end of her eight month of her first pregnancy, but nonetheless she continues as a reservist at the UAV squadron, where she executes missions for hours on end, as part of Operation “Protective Edge”, in order to protect the State of Israel.

In addition to the challenges of executing the missions of the squadron, Ronnie deals with other concerns. “They say it’s not good to be under stress during pregnancy and directing fighter jets or seeing our soldiers on the ground injured is not the most calming”, she says. “The technology allows me to execute the missions without being put in physical danger, so when we have a mission, I try to stay calm as much as possible and as far as I’m concerned that’s enough”.

It’s Worth It

The work in the squadron demands from Captain Ronnie spending long hours in the UAV control room. “It is not easy sitting in the UAV control room for hours on end when you’re in the advanced stages of pregnancy”, she adds. “But from the first moment of the operation, I had no doubt that I would go to the squadron and take part in the effort. When they told me that the squadron would have trouble completing with mission without me, it further solved my dilemma”.

As part of her job as a UAV operator, Captain Ronnie accompanies the ground forces and helps them by watching the event from above. Among other things, her job includes combing the territory where the forces on the ground operate, directing them to enemy forces and identifying potential threats. “You can say unequivocally that I saved the lives of soldiers when I identified a squad of terrorists who were about to launch a rocket towards the tanks or a terrorist waiting for them” she says. “Ultimately, the satisfaction that I get from knowing that I protect the citizens of the state and the soldiers in the field is worth all the difficulties and the physical pain”.

Ronnie met her husband, Major Omer, when they attended the flight school, each in his/her own piloting course. These days, he serves as a fighter pilot in the “Bat” squadron and serves as a control officer in the IAF situation room.

 

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