Sister Squadrons Train Up North

As the most prominent airbase in the region, the flight in the north gives us the ability to freely produce a training exercise in a large area, both in the sea and on land”

Picture Courtsey of Guy Ashash 

Sister Squadrons Train Up North

During the training exercise, the fighter squadrons practiced teamwork, working as a one group

Picture Courtsey of Guy Ashash 

Three sister squadrons from northern Israel met at a crowded briefing room, and from there went out together on complex training flights in the skies of northern Israel. As part of a special workshop, the three fighter squadrons had to work as one group and to learn about one another’s work practices

Noa Fenigstein

This week, an unusually large number of aircrews gathered at the briefing room of the “Valley” squadron at the Ramat David airbase: three of the base’s fighter squadrons, i.e. the “Valley” squadron, the “Knights of the North” squadron, and the “First Jet” squadron met for a briefing prior to a complex joint training exercise. Simulating the enemy, the “Flying Dragon” squadron led the joint workshop in the skies of northern Israel, while the three northern squadrons had to work alongside one another against complex threats for four especially intense days.

The Winning Team
“The workshop is an important training exercise for the base”, explains Colonel Nir Barkan, commander of the Ramat-David airbase. “As the most prominent airbase in the region, the flight in the north gives us the ability to freely produce a training exercise in a large area, both in the sea and on land, and to train for one of the most important missions: protecting the northern skies of Israel”.

During the training exercise, the fighter squadrons practiced teamwork, working as a one group. “All the briefings and debriefings are done together”, explains Major Oded, Deputy Commander of the “Valley” squadron. “The flight formations were mixed, and the missions were identical, but they did not necessarily correspond to the designated missions of each squadron. That’s how we learned from one another, as pilots and as aircrews”.

Red Sky
The “Flying Dragon” squadron, which made its way all the way from the southern Ouvda airbase, simulated the enemy during the joint workshop. “The squadron prepares the orders for all the squadrons, controls the schedules, and guides the participating squadrons”, adds Captain David, leader of the exercise at the “Flying Dragon” squadron. “The workshop poses a challenge for us too, since we have to control an environment with which we are not familiar and the picture changes a bit”.

 

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