Haaretz
Jerusalem Post
Yediot Aharonot
Ma’ariv
Globes
Israel Hayom

Summary of editorials from the Hebrew press

 

The Jerusalem Post discusses former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert’s remorseless response to the outcome of his appeal to the Supreme Court, and asserts: “Once Olmert internalizes the verdict of the Supreme Court and expresses true remorse, he can begin to look toward the future.”

Haaretz criticizes the Israel Police, who, “careening from embarrassing scandal to embarrassing scandal, finally figured out what’s undermining Israel’s social order: Playwright and video artist Natali Cohen Vaxberg, whose claim to fame is a video of herself defecating on the flags of 40 nations, including that of Israel.” The editor argues that the persecution of the artist “reveals a bad, McCarthyist spirit, which encourages attempts to silence those at all critical of the authorities – even if it’s legitimate artistic criticism, which is not only permissible but also necessary in a democratic society,” and concludes: “The Israel Police must immediately halt its foolish witch hunt against Cohen Vaxberg and focus on its crucial role in a democratic state.”

Yediot Aharonot analyzes Israeli society and asserts: “We are sick with a disease whose main symptom is destabilization of the rational and moral grounds on which the Israeli democracy was established, and has brought us so far.” The author contends that “The most amazing thing in Israel on the eve of 2016 is the national silence,” and argues that if the leadership remains silent, “this country will keep on losing its mind,” and there will be no chance for a national recovery.

Israel Hayom notes that “Muslim-majority areas in Europe that are already partial no-go zones are turning into violent, Islamic-ruled enclaves,” and contends that governments are willing abdicate control in those areas “Because of a fervent, slightly desperate hope to avoid confrontation.” The author warns that “The mix of feeble European governments and a strong Islamic drive for power points to future unrest, crises, breakdown, and even civil war,” and asserts that “if catastrophe is to be avoided, all partial no-go zones must be dismantled soon and with swift determination, based on a renewed sense of self-worth.”

[Yoel Esteron and Daniel Pipes wrote today’s articles in Yediot Aharonot and Israel Hayom, respectively.]