The Boeing plane That Become a Couch

Photo by: MotorArt

The Boeing plane That Become a Couch

Photo by: MotorArt

The Boeing plane That Become a Couch

Photo by: MotorArt

The Boeing plane That Become a Couch

Photo by: MotorArt

The Boeing plane That Become a Couch

Photo by: MotorArt

For the past 15 years, the American company “MotoArt” takes out-of-use planes parts and turns them into unique furniture such as tables, couches and beds

Naomi Zoreff | Translation: Eden Sharon

When aircraft go out of use, some of them are sent to an aircraft bone yard, while others are sold to foreign countries. But the people of the American furniture company “MotorArt” found a slightly different use for the parts: they turn them into tables, couches and even beds. “My business partner and I started the adventure nearly 15 years ago. We met at a previous company that designed theme entertainment signage for sports arenas & entertainment parks”, says Dave Hole, company co-founder.

“One day my partnered rescued an old beat up propeller out of a scrap aluminum truck, and the rest is history. Today we have 18 employees and dealerships around the world who sell our work. We professionally crate all our work and ship via sea or air. If the order is large enough or needs special care, we will fly out and supervise the installation”.

Quite the thrill
MotorArt’s target audience is mainly large corporations like Microsoft, Boeing and other leading companies around the world. “Commercial aircraft is easier for us to find so you see a lot of our series are designed around the Boeing 737 and 747”, explains Hole. “The old vintage pieces like DC-3’s, B-25 Bombers and B-52’s are nearly impossible to find. Homeland Security restrictions do not allow you to sell military parts any longer and vintage aircraft are mostly long gone”.

The company has over 130 limited editions series. When Hole was asked to point out his favorite item among his creations, it was hard for him to answer. “Actually, what’s most memorable is how we found the pieces and the effort it took”, he summarizes. “We once found a WWI Fokker that has been left hidden for decades. Quite the thrill. I hope to always continue designing and do what I enjoy the most”.

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