The Next Generation of the Intelligence Division Learns From the Past

In their next job, the cadets will implement the significant changes, about which they learned, taking into consideration the relevant threats of the present era. The Next Generation of the Intelligence Division Learns From the Past

Pilots went out to aerial battles without relevent aerial intellegence on the threats to be expected The Next Generation of the Intelligence Division Learns From the Past The Next Generation of the Intelligence Division Learns From the Past

Cadets completing the commissioned officer’s course went 40 years back in time to learn about the Yom Kippur War Cadets completing the commissioned officer’s course, who will take up positions in the Intelligence Division of the IAF, came from Ouvda airbase to take part in a seminar on the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the changes in the IAF intelligence community that have taken place ever since. “The failures of the war allow us to understand the nature of the jobs we will have to do”

Shir Cohen

The Intelligence community of the IAF has undergone many changes over the years, the main one of which came with the conclusions drawn at the end of the 1973 Yom Kippur War. Last week, the next generation of intelligence officers, cadets completing the commissioned officer’s course, went 40 years back in time to the war that left such a deep impression and they reviewed the performance of the Division at that time. “This day was dedicated to explaining the importance of the Intelligence Division of the IAF as a separate entity from the general Intelligence Corps of the IDF”, explains cadet Maayan, who was responsible for organizing the seminar. “The many failures that occurred in the Division over the course of the Yom Kippur War allow us to learn and understand the nature of the jobs we will have to do”.

One of the most important aspects that were introduced to cadets was the severe shortage of relevant aerial intelligence during the war. The cadets heard firsthand about the aerial battles to which the pilots flew out as they had no information on the expected threats to them on the battlefield. “On the evening before the war broke out, there was complacency and they let us go home”, former fighter pilot, Colonel (res.) Ami Manor, told them when talking about one of the most fateful flights of his life. “When they finally summoned me to the squadron, I came to Ramat David with a “Skyhawk” plane from Hatzerim air and I took off towards Syria. Because of a lack of organization and relevant aerial intelligence during one of my first flights in the war, there was a malfunction and I was forced to abandon the aircraft”.

In another week or so, the young cadets will become regular commissioned officers in the intelligence community and will be integrated into the heart of one of the most sensitive areas of the air force. In their next job, the cadets will implement the significant changes, about which they learned, taking into consideration the relevant threats of the present era. “It is very important to look back and see the things that have happened to us since”, Major Tamir, head of decoding in the IAF, said to the cadets. “But, only so that these things don’t happen again”. 

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