For one night of the year, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem​ turns into a hub of raucous nighttime encounters. The visitors are not just observers but partners who experience, respond, and charge the artistic creations with additional meaning.

Israel Museum in Jerusalem wakes up at night

 

Copyright: MFA video

For one night of the year, the Israel Museum in Jerusalem​ turns into a hub of raucous nighttime encounters during which art peels itself off the walls, pours out of the collections, and rolls out of the museum spaces and into the souls of the thousands of visitors. Tonight, the visitors are not just observers but partners who experience, respond, and charge the artistic creations with additional meaning.

In its sixth year, Contact Point continues to challenge itself and its guests. From dusk until three in the morning, dozens of artists present thought-provoking interactions throughout the museum and the art garden. Performance artists are placed between and inside artworks, with which they engage through music, dance, speech and other creative innovations to devise a new and exciting reality.

These nighttime experiences, unfolding alongside the museum’s permanent and temporary exhibitions, redefining the concept of a museum visit and its role in the contemporary art world.

Some examples:

  • Contact Point’s traditional earphone party, with some 1,500 participants, takes place next to Anish Kapoor’s monumental sculpture, Turning the World Upside Down.
  • Experience the museum at a different pace: instead of walking slowly and stopping at each artwork, you can run through its galleries.
  • Observe art with your eyes closed. With a soft blindfold covering your eyes, and small earphones in your ears, you will be guided on a tour of the museum. How do artworks looks when we don’t see them? Can art only be experienced through vision?